iceboat.org https://www.iceboat.org Home of the Four Lakes Ice Yacht Club of Madison, WI, USA. Thu, 17 Oct 2019 13:01:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.4 https://www.iceboat.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/cropped-icon5-32x32.jpg iceboat.org https://www.iceboat.org 32 32 126378242 Throw Back Thursday: 100 Years ago on Mendota https://www.iceboat.org/2019/10/17/throw-back-thursday-100-years-ago-on-mendota/ Thu, 17 Oct 2019 13:01:51 +0000 https://www.iceboat.org/?p=6959 The post Throw Back Thursday: 100 Years ago on Mendota appeared first on iceboat.org.

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Stern-Steerer Ice Yachts, skaters,  and winter enthusiasts enjoying the perfect ice on Lake Mendota in 1919. 

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Robert “Ecky” Eckstein https://www.iceboat.org/2019/10/14/robert-ecky-eckstein/ Mon, 14 Oct 2019 14:02:00 +0000 https://www.iceboat.org/?p=6929 UPDATE: October 16, 2019: Please join family and friends of Robert “Ecky” Eckstein at his celebration of life CELEBRATION OF LIFE LOCATION: South Side Ice Yacht Club 1842 S. Main st. Oshkosh. DATE: Monday, October 28, 2019 TIME: 3 PM – 8 PM Open bar and catered food. Oshkosh ice yacht sailor, Robert “Ecky” Eckstein, […]

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Photo: Ken Norton

UPDATE: October 16, 2019: Please join family and friends of Robert “Ecky” Eckstein at his celebration of life
CELEBRATION OF LIFE
LOCATION: South Side Ice Yacht Club
1842 S. Main st. Oshkosh.
DATE: Monday, October 28, 2019
TIME: 3 PM – 8 PM
Open bar and catered food.

Oshkosh ice yacht sailor, Robert “Ecky” Eckstein, passed away on October 13, 2019. Ecky was a long time Lake Winnebago iceboater and sailed A stern-steerers, Renegades and multiple other iceboats. He was a lifetime member of the South Side Ice Yacht Club in Oshkosh, WI.

In true ice boating spirit, Ecky always offered his help and shop to any sailor who needed it. An example of that was during the 2006 Renegade regatta on Lake Winnebago when he made sure two 4LIYC skippers were able to complete their regattas after some first-day equipment failures by fashioning new steering components and a front stay tang.

George Gerhardt and Ecky enjoying a beautiful day of sailing Ken Norton’s boat in Florida a couple of years ago.

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Sail Siberia 2020 https://www.iceboat.org/2019/10/13/sail-siberia-2020/ Sun, 13 Oct 2019 13:30:11 +0000 https://www.iceboat.org/?p=6919 Ice sailors, in March 2020 you have an opportunity to take the trip of a lifetime. Sailing on the largest freshwater lake in the world in one of the most remote areas of the planet is an adventure you’ll never forget. Below, German DN sailor Jörg Bohn G-737 shares his love story to Baikal. Going […]

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Ice sailors, in March 2020 you have an opportunity to take the trip of a lifetime. Sailing on the largest freshwater lake in the world in one of the most remote areas of the planet is an adventure you’ll never forget. Below, German DN sailor Jörg Bohn G-737 shares his love story to Baikal.
Baikal: What To Know for 2020

Going East!

Have your ever considered going to Lake Baikal?
Here is why it’s worth the trip!

By DN G-737 Jörg Bohn

The Baikal Short “Love“ Story!
Since 2012 I’ve traveled every year to Siberia and the Far East to go ice sailing.
In 2012, I heard about the Lake Baikal event from British ice sailor, Chris Williams K-1.
The logistics of getting our iceboats to Siberia were solved that first time with help of our Russian ice sailing friends in Moscow and the Trans Siberian Railway. We flew to Irkutsk from Europe through Moscow. We arrived in Irkutsk early Friday morning, one day ahead the event.
A minibus was waiting for us at the airport, thanks to our hosts, and took us straight to the sailing area called “Little Sea“ (Sarma), opposite of Olchon Island, to a place called Uyota. Even though, I was tired it wasn’t possible to fall asleep on that five hour ride. I had never before in my life seen such a wide open beautiful mountain landscape. Thousands of cattle and horses were scattered on both sides of the road and sometimes right in front us. Half way into our trip we stopped for a delicious meal at a roadside restaurant made by the indigenous Burjatien people.

The paved road turned to gravel when Lake Baikal appeared in the distance. Forty five minutes later we arrived at a picturesque lodge nestled next to he lake. The shipping container with our iceboats arrived at the same moment.
Our group was warmly welcomed by Galina, the lodge owner. Hotel rooms or cabins, both with separate bathrooms were our choice for a very reasonable price. Food was ready right after check-in. One of the specialities at Uyota is Sagodai, a marinated Omul sashimi topped with onions and pepper. Omul is the most famous and common fish of Lake Baikal. Of course many dishes of traditional meat and salads were served as well. Later when were on the ice sailing our boats, we were delighted when Galia and her staff delivered a courtesy lunch right out on the starting line.
13 hours of daylight and comfortable temperatures around freezing on sunny days are the standard. The breeze varies between mostly light to medium and sometimes a bit more, especially in the mornings when there can be sudden gusts before the wind around noon. The ice is hard and the thickness between 1 and 2 meters. The bay we sail on measures 5 x 40 miles. The lake itself is about 50 x 400 miles of size and 1 mile deep. It measures 25% percent of the world’s freshwater. Lake Baikal is 23 million years, the oldest lake on our planet (the second oldest is 2.5 million years old).
You can feel a special energy from the lake that makes this place unique, even magical. It’s probably one of the reasons, aside from the unbelievable Russian hospitality, that got me hooked. There’s so much more to discover, for instance, holy springs and landmarks revered by the indigenous people, , fresh water seals, and caves with ancient paintings.
The launching and sailing area is easily accessible, right in front of the lodge, an easy 5 minute walk or you can hop aboard the free on-demand shuttle bus which runs all day long.
The race committee gives plenty of notice when to leave the pits towards the race course. As mentioned earlier, the wind takes some time to settle into it’s direction. Therefore, racing doesn’t normally begin before noon which makes for a relaxing morning. There are three regattas scheduled during the 8 day regatta week. One day is an off-day to allow for exploring the area by Hovercraft, Russian off-road vehicle, helicopter, or hiking. The regattas are the Asia Cup, the Russian Championship and the Baikal Cup. There’s lots of great sailing and probably the most boat time you’ll get all season! Since 2012 we have been able to sail every single day! Depending on the number of DN sailors we mostly sail in two fleets. The Ice Optis are also a racing that week.
Ice sailing is social and in the lodge, there are special evenings with Asian, Russian and European dinner parties. Live music is often played spontaneously. The number of participants from Europe and the US have grown from 4 to over 40 DN Sailors. Logistics are challenging but well worth the effort. Truck transportation takes more than 8 weeks on the road: from Moscow to Germany to pick up our containers, then to Lake Baikal, staying there during the event, and again to Germany and finally back to Moscow, including a whole week at customs. The containers have built-in racks for safe equipment travel and to get 21 boats in each.
The number of sailors going to Lake Baikal is growing constantly. The reason is simple. Even though, initially everybody plans the Baikal journey as a once in a lifetime trip, they all return “Going East“, year after year.
See you on the ice! JörG-737
If you are interested, the next event is scheduled March 14th until March 21st!
Check the leaflet “What to know“ for further information!,
Special note for those planning a trip from North America:
Those of you, time permitting, might have the chance to combine two, three or more events in Europe with Lake Baikal. You can fly in to Germany on Lufthansa and ship your boats along as windsurfing equipment , departing from Chicago, Detroit or Boston. You can travel to the Worlds 2020 with G-737 and then leave your boat with G-737 for Baikal. G-737 will put your boats in the Baikal container. Boats could be stored at G-737 after Baikal and be used again e.g. for the Eastern Challenge in Finland in November or even the Europeans before taking them home to the Worlds in the US. Of course, you could leave a boat here like many US sailors do for future events too. Contact G-737 for details.

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Freeze Alert! https://www.iceboat.org/2019/10/11/freeze-alert/ Fri, 11 Oct 2019 12:45:44 +0000 https://www.iceboat.org/?p=6913 If you’re an ice sailor, the cold front moving across the Midwest (which has prompted a freeze warning opportunity) is a good sign of things to come. Snow is falling out in DN Western Challenge land in Minnesota. Nite class Commodore John Hayashi shares news about an early-season Nite regatta: The Nite class is adding […]

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If you’re an ice sailor, the cold front moving across the Midwest (which has prompted a freeze warning opportunity) is a good sign of things to come. Snow is falling out in DN Western Challenge land in Minnesota.
Nite class Commodore John Hayashi shares news about an early-season Nite regatta:

The Nite class is adding an early season regatta to the mix for the end of 2019. Hopefully there will be good ice in the upper Midwest so that we can get new Nite owners up to speed and out on the ice sooner than normal. Now is the time to work on your Nites, don’t wait  for those last minute repairs or new parts.

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Spaight St. Syndicate: Bubble Baby Skeeter Got Back https://www.iceboat.org/2019/10/07/spaight-st-syndicate-bubble-baby-skeeter-got-back/ Mon, 07 Oct 2019 12:32:02 +0000 https://www.iceboat.org/?p=6892 Daniel Hearn continues to work like a mad scientist while building his Class C Skeeter in his basement laboratory. Baby Got Back The little hussy is no longer prancing around leaving little to the imagination.  I call it the Lulu Lemon Effect. Much to the delight of testosterone-filled young men across the country (OK, the […]

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Daniel Hearn continues to work like a mad scientist while building his Class C Skeeter in his basement laboratory.
Previously at the Spaight St. Syndicate

Baby Got Back

The little hussy is no longer prancing around leaving little to the imagination.  I call it the Lulu Lemon Effect. Much to the delight of testosterone-filled young men across the country (OK, the old guys don’t mind either), stretchy pants have become acceptable casual wear, formal wear and everything in between for young women.  I’m dying to know how they wear them without ANY undergarment lines showing.  I’d ask my wife, but that would be a dead giveaway that I might occasionally look.  All three of my daughters pull this off, as well, but I decided I probably really don’t want to know.  But know this, young men—big daddio is watching.  He may not be all that big, but he’s Pitbull-mean and fights dirty.  Eyes on the horizon, Bevis.

 

She’s still got her tramp stamp showing, however.  I’m pretty sure she’s intentionally leaving the small of her back exposed, like she’s proud of her decision to deface her body for life.  You’d think spending time at a waterpark would be enough to demonstrate that these things don’t end well.  What she doesn’t know is that I’ve tipped off her mother.  Yesterday will be the last time the base of her spine sees the light of day, unless she’s wearing a swimming suit.  Which is going to be NEVER, because iceboats and swimming don’t go together.

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RAMBL’N Red https://www.iceboat.org/2019/09/29/rambln-red/ Sun, 29 Sep 2019 14:16:54 +0000 https://www.iceboat.org/?p=6808 Paul Krueger’s Class A Skeeter RAMBL’N is sporting a new coat of paint today in the traditional colors of the 4LIYC, red and white. Paul’s daughter asked Ken Whitehorse if all the recent modifications on PK’s boat would make him go “too fast”. Ken told her not to worry, he went for the pretty paint […]

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Paul Krueger’s Class A Skeeter RAMBL’N is sporting a new coat of paint today in the traditional colors of the 4LIYC, red and white. Paul’s daughter asked Ken Whitehorse if all the recent modifications on PK’s boat would make him go “too fast”. Ken told her not to worry, he went for the pretty paint job instead of the fast one. Paul said, “We waited for a west wind so there were no complaints from the neighbor on over spray”. [Hey, there’s only one neighbor, iceboat.org headquarters!- Ed.]

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Spaight St. Syndicate: The Old Man and the C https://www.iceboat.org/2019/09/26/spaight-st-syndicate-the-old-man-and-the-c/ Thu, 26 Sep 2019 18:50:06 +0000 https://www.iceboat.org/?p=6799 A wise visitor from the south, Skeeter Iceboat Club’s Lou Lonnecke, pays a visit to the Spaight St. Syndicate. Daniel Hearn reports: The Old Man and the C If they had ice in Cuba, I’m certain Earnest Hemingway would have been an ice sailor. Last Sunday I was the (not-so)-young apprentice “Mandolin,” learning from the […]

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Previously at the Spaight St. Syndicate
A wise visitor from the south, Skeeter Iceboat Club’s Lou Lonnecke, pays a visit to the Spaight St. Syndicate. Daniel Hearn reports:

The Old Man and the C

If they had ice in Cuba, I’m certain Earnest Hemingway would have been an ice sailor. Last Sunday I was the (not-so)-young apprentice “Mandolin,” learning from the Grand Master Lou, “Santiago” Loenneke. One of the realities of ice sailing is that you can be an old man yourself, but still the youngest guy in the room. We may be gray, but we know how to play!

Hemingway’s last major work, the novel tells the story of a battle between an aging, experienced fisherman, Santiago, and a massive marlin. Mandolin has great admiration for Santiago, but Santiago is on a bit of an unlucky streak. Kind of like getting tossed at the leeward mark on Lake Pepin last winter, but I’m not mentioning any names. Santiago eventually hooks the big one and battles the fish for three days until he is worn out and nearly delirious. That’s exactly the way Lou felt when he left the Syndicate on Sunday after battling with the top deck of my prized Madison marlin. She didn’t lay down easy, but in the end the old salt showed her who was boss. OSHA would frown upon the flattening method, but she complied, nonetheless, with 155 lbs. of movable “encouragement.”

Someday I hope my work will land in the hands of an adoring fan, who will find the creator’s signature hidden away inside a bulkhead.

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Peter Lundt https://www.iceboat.org/2019/09/21/peter-lundt/ Sun, 22 Sep 2019 00:35:05 +0000 https://www.iceboat.org/?p=6778 UPDATE: (September 26, 2019) A memorial gathering will be held at GUNDERSON EAST FUNERAL AND CREMATION CARE, 5203 Monona Dr., Madison, from 3 p.m. until 5 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 5, 2019.A full obituary will appear at a later date. We have some sad news to report, long time Four Lakes Ice Yacht Club member […]

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Peter Lundt races his DN at the 100 year anniversary of the Northwest regatta sailed on Green Lake in Green Lake, Wisconsin in 2013.

Obituary
UPDATE
: (September 26, 2019) A memorial gathering will be held at GUNDERSON EAST FUNERAL AND CREMATION CARE, 5203 Monona Dr., Madison, from 3 p.m. until 5 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 5, 2019.A full obituary will appear at a later date.

We have some sad news to report, long time Four Lakes Ice Yacht Club member Peter Lundt has passed away. Peter, an avid DN sailor, served as Secretary of the 4LIYC in the 1980s. Peter contributed to the club in other ways such as cooking and serving a high quality ham at club picnics, a tradition he continued to honor Jim Payton’s memory because Jim started it 40 years ago.  Funeral arrangements are pending and will be posted here when available. Gunderson’s Funeral Home in Monona is serving the family. Peter was also a passionate soft water sailor and belonged to the Lake Monona Sailing Club. Fair winds and black ice, Peter.

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4LIYC Meeting Dates & New Location Announced https://www.iceboat.org/2019/09/20/4liyc-meeting-dates-new-location-announced/ Fri, 20 Sep 2019 21:25:51 +0000 https://www.iceboat.org/?p=6774 Your governing committee has been busy thinking ice and arranging the 2019-2020 4LIYC meeting schedule. We are excited to announce that our 4LIYC bi-weekly meetings will be held at the Breakwater Restaurant in Monona on the Yahara River. We will meet at 6:30 PM and we encourage you to drop in early for some dinner. […]

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Your governing committee has been busy thinking ice and arranging the 2019-2020 4LIYC meeting schedule.
We are excited to announce that our 4LIYC bi-weekly meetings will be held at the Breakwater Restaurant in Monona on the Yahara River. We will meet at 6:30 PM and we encourage you to drop in early for some dinner. (Did you know that Breakwater’s building is owned by the Four Lakes Yacht Club?)
MEETING SCHEDULE

  • November 6
  • November 20 Elections, Elect Fleet Captains. Vote on ISA & NIYA Agenda Items
  • December 4
  • December 18
  • January 2 THURSDAY Honor Roll Nominations
  • January 15
  • January 29 Deadline for By-Law or Racing Rules Amendment Submission
  • February 12
  • February 26 Business Meeting
  • March 11

Location: Breakwater Restaurant
6308 Metropolitan Lane
Monona, Wisconsin
Time: 6:30 PM
(Come earlier for dinner)

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That Thing Got A Hemi? https://www.iceboat.org/2019/09/19/that-thing-got-a-hemi/ Thu, 19 Sep 2019 22:13:34 +0000 https://www.iceboat.org/?p=6732 You’re about the find out. Are you ready for another Spaight Street Syndicate installment? Daniel Hearn’s C Class Skeeter build enters the “sweeeet” phase. No hemi, but all sorts of other, hopefully, go-fast stuff under the hood. That’s my show and tell for now, but I’ll leave you with the “Tip of the Week”—cutting Kevlar […]

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You’re about the find out.


Are you ready for another Spaight Street Syndicate installment? Daniel Hearn’s C Class Skeeter build enters the “sweeeet” phase.
Previously at the Spaight St. Syndicate

No hemi, but all sorts of other, hopefully, go-fast stuff under the hood.

Springboard attachment brackets. Not fast if your springboard falls off. First time I ever sailed an iceboat was Donny Anderson’s Nite on Lake Kegonsa. Springboard fell off. I didn’t know there was hazing before I joined the fraternity.

Rubber covered steering tube stops to avoid metal-to-metal thump if I max out (about 45 degree angle). Delrin guides for steering tubes and cable. Blue bungee routed through low-friction rings retracts brake.

All major mechanicals in between same bulkheads cavity, in case access is ever needed. Renegade-style steering using a go-cart sprocket attached to a hub I made. My technical consultant, Pat Heppert, recommended a 67-tooth to get the correct ratio between sprocket and steering wings on front chock, to balance force required and twitchiness. PVC tube guides chain which is connected to steering cable. Length is sized so that connection points never exit their respective tube when steering is maxed out in either direction. Steering post wings are connected to steering wheel sprocket with spliced Spectra line.

Adjustable length, rubber covered foot pedals. The bungeed blocks attached to the center stringer and sideboards maintain necessary tension. When using the Renegade-style steering on a shorter LOA front-seater boat, I discovered that the geometry gets messed up, causing too much slack in the rope that connects the steering post wings to the steering wheel sprocket, as the angles change from an isosceles triangle to an obtuse. And here I thought I’d never use my high school geometry! Wouldn’t want the chain to jump off the steering wheel sprocket.

Lightweight, pre-fab, aluminum steering wheel normally used on Midget cars. Good-size diameter for easy turning in the pits. Close to zero drop to maximize leg space. Blue Spectra line attaches to brake. Salvaged the rubber handle from an old backpack blower. Wanted something that wouldn’t clank around in the cockpit. Positioned for easy grab with gloves on.

Harken two-speed winch for plenty of purchase. Planning to leave the vertical handle on to start, although I understand most of the Skeeter guys end up taking them off. In the most forward practical winching position, I don’t expect the vertical handle to contact the closed canopy. At least that’s what my rough fit canopy test is telling me.

Rectangular aluminum tube serves dual purpose of anchor for blocks and seat back stud (back side of seat back will be attached to this). Added a stainless angle to reinforce. I’m using a cascading block system, but chose to deal with the “lazy” blocks by suspending them on a cable, rather than holding them up with a fabric “hammock” like the A-Skeeter guys are doing. This block doesn’t move, but the other two do, so they are suspended with from bullet blocks.

Here you can see how the blocks will move along the cable. They are held up from below with a golf whiffle ball. (I have nine more. Anybody need some?) The sheet routes through the aft cockpit bulkhead at a height which creates the optimum angle for the sheet rope entering the winch per Harken specs.

Tucked way in back is the exit block, which must carry the heavy load. This one can handle more force than the hull itself could withstand. It’s anchored in place with a titanium shaft reinforced with stainless steel plates on both inside and outside of both sideboards. Custom Delrin washers keep the block centered on the shaft. The shackle connecting the block to the shaft will allow it to rotate up and down if different sheet attachment positions on the boom change the sheet angle some. An oversize low friction ring will ultimately be epoxied into the “backbone” with a stopper ball preventing the sheet from dropping down into the hull.

That’s my show and tell for now, but I’ll leave you with the “Tip of the Week”—cutting Kevlar fabric requires a crazy sharp scissors. YouTube showed me how to turn an ordinary Fiskars into a Kevlar cutting machine!

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